Recommended: Why Does Privacy Matter?

One Scholar’s Answer Atlantic writer Jathan Sadowski argues that we need to better understand the purpose and value of privacy in his discussion of legal scholar Julie Cohen’s new article, “What Privacy is For,“ which is forthcoming from the Harvard Law Review:  “Even though the practices of many companies such as Facebook are legal, there is something disconcerting about them. Privacy should have a deeper purpose than the one...

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Call for Action: Tell Congress to Protect Online Privacy

The Electronic Computer Privacy Act (ECPA) is scheduled for markup tomorrow, Thursday, November 29th, in the Senate Judiciary Committee (SJC). Originally enacted in 1986 as a means of addressing telephonic wiretapping, at a time when technology was less complex and the Internet had not yet become a ubiquitous means of communication, ECPA is no longer adequate to protect the privacy of email and other digital communications. Reform is necessary...

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RFID Credit Cards: Is Your Identity Safe?

Via the site Investopedia, a discussion about the security of so-called “smart credit cards” that store information about the card and its owner on a tiny RFID microchip embedded in the card. The RFID microchip embedded in the card can be read by remote machines without being touched by the vendor, raising concerns that persons using hidden, rogue RFID readers will be able to steal the card’s information in order to commit fraud and...

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No Warrant, No Problem: How the Government Can Still Get Your Digital Data

Theodoric Meyer and Peter Maass of ProPublica, the public interest journalism group, have written a useful and readable guide to the many ways the government can legally snoop on your online data without a search warrant. From their introduction: The U.S. government isn’t allowed to wiretap American citizens without a warrant from a judge. But there are plenty of legal ways for law enforcement, from the local sheriff to the FBI, to snoop on...

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