ALA says “NO!” to Section 215 reauthorization gambit

(Crossposted from ALA-WO’s District Dispatch) As both chambers of Congress prepare to take up and debate long-needed surveillance law reform, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s (R-KY) bill (introduced late yesterday) to simply reauthorize the “library provision” (Section 215) of the USA PATRIOT Act until 2020 without change of any kind was met today by a storm of opposition from leading privacy and civil liberties groups with...

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Who’s Reading the Reader? : Choose Privacy Week 2015

This year’s observance of Choose Privacy Week, May 1 – 7, 2015 asks the question, “Who’s Reading the Reader?” The rapid development of online and digital technologies have given governments and corporations alike the ability to track, record, and monitor our communications and reading habits – a very real threat to the reader’s right to privacy. During Choose Privacy Week the American Library Association invites...

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It’s now or (almost) never for real NSA reform; contacting Congress today critical!

Courtesy of the ALA Washington Office’s District Dispatch blog: It was mid-summer when Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT), the outgoing Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, answered the House of Representative’s passage of an unacceptably weak version of the USA FREEDOM Act by introducing S. 2685, a strong, bipartisan bill of his own. Well, it’s taken until beyond Veterans Day, strong lobbying by civil liberties groups and tech...

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E-books and Privacy …. Again.

A few years ago, after the disclosure that Amazon was collecting and storing user data associated with the loan of library e-books to Kindle users, I wrote an article briefly exploring the “digital dilemma” associated with providing users access to e-books and other resources via third party vendors. At the time I noted that [t]he current model of digital content delivery for libraries places library users’ privacy at risk....

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Choose Privacy Week 2014: Privacy Issues for Incarcerated Youth

by Kelly Czarnecki Teen Librarian Charlotte Mecklenburg Library We might not think too often about privacy issues in regards to the incarcerated. Why should they be online anyway? In most cases, they’re not. However, in some places they are. In my experience for instance, I have provided outreach as a public Librarian to juvenile offenders and we have been able to access the Internet for various purposes. While there is of course the initial...

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