Privacy News & Views – April 8-14

Video: Wiretaps, data dumps and zero days: is digital privacy no longer possible? | The Guardian Student Privacy Spying on Students: School-Issued Devices and Student Privacy | Electronic Frontier Foundation ICYMI: School Surveillance: The Consequences for Equity and Privacy  | National Association of State Boards of Education Privacy Law and Regulation The U.S. Congress Is Not the Leader in Privacy or Data Security Law | Teach Privacy 4 ways...

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Choose Privacy Week 2017 Webinar: Learn Practical Privacy Practices on April 13

Defending patron privacy in the library means more than advocating against the PATRIOT Act; it also requires a commitment to utilizing practical privacy tools and tactics that secure patron data and help counter unwanted online data collection.  Learn more about these tools and tactics during the 2017 Choose Privacy Week webinar, Practical Privacy Practices, which will take place on Thursday, April 13, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern/1:00 p.m....

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How Libraries Can Respond to the Repeal of the FCC Privacy Rules

by Deborah Caldwell-Stone and Michael Robinson This week Congress, voting along party lines, passed a resolution that repealed the groundbreaking privacy rules adopted by the Federal Communications Commission last October under the Obama administration.  The new rules would have required ISPs to adopt fair information privacy practices in regards to their customers’ data, including a requirement that the ISP obtain affirmative...

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Bolt the “Back Door” on Federal Surveillance

crossposted from the ALA Washington Office The FBI and its powerful backers in Congress have been pushing relentlessly for years for access to all of our electronic communications, even the ones we think we’ve protected. They want to require by law that any encryption technology and software we might use to protect our privacy be deliberately built to give all of law enforcement easy access to your otherwise secure phone calls, email, texts...

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ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom announces sponsorship of Let’s Encrypt initiative

Crossposted from the OIF Blog Today, the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom announced its sponsorship of “Let’s Encrypt,” a free, automated, and open certificate authority. “Let’s Encrypt” is a service provided by the Internet Security Research Group (ISRG) and is run for the public’s benefit. It will allow anyone who owns a domain name – including libraries – to...

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